About the Project

Once, the prairies drowned beneath an inland sea; Tyndall stone is what remained after the waters receded and the glaciers passed. Strength was born out of time, and these pieces of ancient history became the sturdy foundations of Saskatchewan’s future when the Legislative building was constructed of Tyndall stone 100 years ago.

HiddenTyndall is a public art project by Terri Fidelak in honour of the centennial anniversary of the Saskatchewan Legislative building. In 2012, Terri will place 100 cubes of Tyndall stone throughout the province’s landscape in hopes that they will be serendipitously discovered. Those who come across the cubes will find a message upon the stone, inviting them to participate by returning the Tyndall to the Legislative building in Regina. There the pieces will become part of a permanent installation celebrating the cooperative spirit of the people of Saskatchewan.

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§ 24 Responses to About the Project

  • Sharon P. says:

    Love, love, love your project.

  • Congratulations on a well thought out and thoroughly “engaging” community project. I look forward to hearing tidbits about the grand adventure.

  • Thank you, Corla, I look forward to sharing those tidbits. Stay tuned!

  • Susan Ozembloski says:

    What a great project!! My great grandfather and some of my great uncles were involved in the construction of the Legislative building.

    • Hi Susan! Thanks, I’m glad you like the idea! I’m always so interested to hear stories about the people involved with the Legislative construction. It must have been amazing to see.

  • Tammy says:

    I just love this project – hoping to find one to be part of it all…any hints?

  • Cathy says:

    I am intrigued by your wonderful project. I recognize the
    Silo in the falling down pictures . Any chance there is a stone hidden in that town ? hint hint … I shall look around anyway .
    Thanks for the project !

  • Hi Cathy,
    I’m so pleased you like the project! There may very well be a stone hidden around there; do keep your eyes open! Once all the stones are hidden (I have about 8 more to go) I will begin giving clues on the blog.
    Good luck!

  • Corianne Grabill says:

    I came across Hidden Tyndall on our library website. I think it is an inspired AND inspiring project! Thank you for sharing Saskatchewan’s beautiful places and people through your art.

  • Hilda Dale says:

    I’m wondering if any more Tyndall stones have been found? I haven’t heard much about it lately. What is the total number now. I’d forgotten about it until I came across the article I had copied about the project.
    What a great project!!!!!

  • Hi Hilda,
    Actually, there has been a significant lack of new discoveries, likely due to the large volume of snow covering our province at the moment! I’m hoping that there will be an upswing in Tyndall stone findings once spring arrives. So far there have been 21 stones unturned, and thirteen of those have been brought to the Legislative building. Thanks for following along, and I’ll try to update the blog soon!
    Best,
    Terri

  • Andy says:

    Hi – I found your stone in Kerrobert! Do you still want them brought back?

  • Hi Andy,
    Yes, please return the stone to the Legislative building when you have a chance. Congratulations and thanks for participating!
    Best,
    Terri

  • Sheldon says:

    I was hoping you could give a clue to a stone location in the Regina area?

    • Hi Sheldon, I certainly can! There is a stone hidden in Regina, but there are also stones in communities nearby. I will work on getting some clues up on the blog right away. Thanks for your suggestion!
      Best, Terri

  • Holly says:

    I have been following this project for quite some time with much interest, and in light of the few stones found this summer, l was wondering if you could give some more clues, I am really interested in the Melfort to Prince Albert area!

  • Paul Boisvert says:

    Hello Terri:

    Recently the students of the Gravelbourg Elementary School discovered one of your ‘stones’. As editor of the Gravelbourg Tribune I’m putting together a story for the newspaper. Would you be willing to answer a few questions? I know the reason why you did the project so here are a few follow up questions…

    1) How many of the stones have been returned?
    2) What was, and has been, the response over the years?
    3) How long do you think it will go on until all are found?
    4) Will you eventually put a time limit on the project?
    5) What have you learned from this project?

    Hope this is okay with you.

    Thanks

    Paul Boisvert
    Editor
    Gravelbourg Tribune

  • Christine says:

    Wondering if there is a Humboldt Stone? Or one close to that hasn’t been found. Thought it would be a fun thing for me and my family to do!

    • Hello! There is not a stone in Humboldt and many of the stones I hid in that area have been discovered, including ones at Muenster and St. Brieux. I have been back to visit some hiding spots near Humboldt (relatively speaking), and the stones are no longer where I left them but I haven’t heard that they were discovered. Those places include Nokomis and Manitou Lake. You might look at Fort Carlton, Batoche, Wadena, Kuroki, Porcupine Plain, or Bjorkdale. I have heard nothing of the stones I left in those places and though I know they are not so close to Humboldt, you never know what you might find! Let me know if you’d like more specific clues. Best, Terri

  • Karl Bazin says:

    Hi Terri
    I found one!!!!! The one in Shaunavon on the Court House window sill. I took it and showed the local paper, the Shaunavon Standard and they did an article. I found it on May 5th 2016. It was very exciting as I had not heard of the project.

    I am pasting the article from the paper ( see below) as it pretty well tells the story. I will be bringing the stone to the legislature hopefully in June.

    All my best
    Karl Bazin
    Swift Current SK

    Provincial court judge K.P. Bazin made an interesting discovery during a visit to Shaunavon last Thursday.
    While Bazin was in town to preside over cases at the Shaunavon courthouse, his discovery had nothing to do with evidence, although it did lead to some investigative work.
    With temperatures expected to hover around the 30 degree Celsius mark that day, Judge Bazin made a point of arriving early in Shaunavon. He makes the trip to hear cases in the Shaunavon courtroom on the first Thursday of every month and he is familiar with how warm the building can get under extreme conditions.
    His plan was to open a few windows to help cool things off and joked that he didn’t want the room to resemble a scene out of “To Kill A Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize winning courthouse story that took place under the searing heat of southern Alabama.
    Bazin’s effort, ironically, turned out to have a bit of a storybook quality itself. While opening the window to the judge’s chamber, he found a piece of tyndall stone with an engraved message sitting on the outside sill.
    It turns out that the stone had been left in complete secrecy – even staff at the Town Office were unaware of its existence – as part of a public art project by Terri Fidelak in honour of the centennial anniversary of the Saskatchewan Legislative building.
    In 2012, Fidelak placed 100 cubes of Tyndall stone throughout the province’s landscape in hopes that they would be serendipitously discovered. Each cube includes a message inviting finders to participate in the project by returning the Tyndall to the Legislative building in Regina.
    There, the pieces will become part of a permanent installation celebrating the cooperative spirit of the people of Saskatchewan
    Bazin says he does plan to bring the stone to the Legislature.
    In her description of the project, Fidelak pointed out that the prairies once drowned beneath an inland sea and that Tyndall stone is what remained after the waters receded and the glaciers passed. Strength was born out of time, and these pieces of ancient history became the sturdy foundations of Saskatchewan’s future when the Legislative building was constructed of Tyndall stone 100 years ago.
    When she started the project in 2012, Fidelak admitted that it could take years before all of the cubes were found. Many were hidden in locations such as provincial parks, small town communities and places with historical meaning.
    “I want to make some of them easy to find because I definitely want some to return,” said Fidelak in an interview at the time. “But on the other hand I really like the aspect of time that is involved with this project and I would love it if some of them took 20 or 50 years to come back to the Lege.”
    At the time she launched the project, Fidelak was one of eight artists in residence selected to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Legislative Building.
    For more information about the project visit hiddentyndall.com
    According to the website, Judge Bazin’s find would be the 40th piece discovered to date.
    A former Swift Current lawyer, Bazin has served as a judge of Swift Current Provincial Court since 2014. He previously served a three year stint as a judge in the Estevan court. Bazin started practicing law in 1985 when he joined the MacBean Tessem law firm and was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 2005.

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